What are people saying about our community mental health services?

Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 15:13 by Amy Gaskin-Williams

 

We recently commissioned The Picker Institute to conduct a re-run of the National Community Mental Health Survey which surveyed a sample of 2000 people seen by our community mental health services between June and August 2015.  582 surveys were returned, which is a response rate of 30% - thank you to all those people who completed the survey. 

·         People rated their overall experience at 7.1 out of 10

Of the 35 questions asked:

·         The Trust scored significantly better on one question in comparison to the average across all Picker scores, and our previous results in 2014:

 “Treatments: did not receive treatments or therapies that did not involve medicines”

·         The Trust scored significantly worse on one question in comparison to our previous results in 2014:

 “Change in people you see: person changed within the last 12 months”

·         In 33 questions, the Trust scores were not significantly different to the Picker averages, or those we achieved in 2014.

All comments received via the community mental health survey will be entered and coded on this website, alongside comments received via the Feedback Survey and Patient Opinion. This will ensure that services are aware of this feedback and use it to inform service development/delivery. They will be expected to report on any changes made as a result via their quarterly Involvement and Experience reports.

The Picker Institute use problem scores as a way of targeting areas in need of attention. The problem score shows the percentage of service users for each question who, by their response, indicated that a particular aspect of their care could have been improved.  It is useful to keep in mind, that lower scores reflect better performance. 

The problem scores of over 50% are shown below:

Day to day living: not given enough support with finding/keeping work

73 %

Other areas of life: Not given information about getting support from people with similar mental health problems

73 %

Day to day living: not given enough support in getting financial advice/benefits

71 %

Other areas of life: did not receive support in taking part in a local activity

70 %

Day to day living: not given enough support with physical health needs

63 %

Day to day living: not given enough support with finding/keeping accommodation

62 %

Change in people you see: has impacted on care

61 %

Other areas of life: people in NHS mental health services do not help with feeling hopeful about what is important

60 %

Other areas of life: people in NHS mental health services do not see what is important

59 %

Planning Care: did not agree what care would be received

58 %

Other areas of life: people in NHS mental health services do not help with what is important

58 %

Crisis care: did not get all the help wanted

57 %

Care and Treatment: not seen often enough/seen too often.

55 %

 

 

 

 

The full report can be seen here: Voluntary Community Mental Health Survey 2016

 

All comments can be seen here: Voluntary Community Mental Health Survey 2015 Comments.xlsx